Business coaching

Business coaching

In preparation for a post-covid world, support Nigerian companies in horticulture through business coaching in strategy finance, supply chain management and human resource management.

Impact Report for AFEX Nigeria

Impact Report for AFEX Nigeria

Supporting AFEX strategy team in development of a theory of change, impact framework and data analysis for evaluating five years of impact. Agri-Logic support was a mixture of impact measurement, capacity building and external verification.

Impact Report 2020 (AFEX)
ESG due diligence

ESG due diligence

Assessment of environmental and social risks in the wider cashew sector one trading company specifically. The due diligence was performed within a 2 week timeframe, including review of company documents, desk research and field visits in two African countries.

Baseline studies for income diversification

Baseline studies for income diversification

For a major trader preparing to conduct several income diversification pilot projects, conduct baseline studies to assess current income levels and income sources of farmers in their supply chain. Household poverty was modeled using PPI and living income assessed in comparison to various benchmarks.

Scoping study horticulture Nigeria

Scoping study horticulture Nigeria

With a combined local and international team, a scoping study was commissioned by the Embassy of The Netherlands to Nigeria, to define the road to improved food security through horticulture. The internal report summarizes production systems and agronomy, as well as value chain, market and finance, and provides recommendations for a large scale development program to be implemented by a consortium.

Scoping study horticulture Nigeria (Netherlands Embassy)
Farmer Field Book on smallholder cocoa farming Côte d’Ivoire for three large cocoa traders

Farmer Field Book on smallholder cocoa farming Côte d’Ivoire for three large cocoa traders

Three Farmer Field Book projects on cocoa farming are ongoing in Côte d’Ivoire in collaboration with three large trade houses. A total of 1,075 cocoa farmers participate in these programs. They record data on their daily farming activities. The gathered data provide insight in the farmers’ farming practices, their cocoa production and productivity as well as their costs and income. Based on these data, recommendations can be made to improve farming practices. An important point of improvement, for example, is the use of fertiliser. Very few cocoa farmers in Côte d’Ivoire use fertiliser, and even fewer farmers use fertiliser with sufficient nitrogen content. As a result, soil nutrients are being depleted and cocoa productivity is low. This may push farmers to cut down forest to use its nutrient-rich soil for cocoa farming. Improved fertiliser use may help to avoid this by preventing soil nutrient depletion.

Agri-Logic provides the project partners with detailed analyses on the drivers of cocoa productivity and farmer income, in which activities as well as other characteristics are considered. Groups of farmers are compared to evaluate the impact of various project interventions aimed to benefit farmers. The analyses also shed light on social topics such as the gap to a living income, gender pay gap and the occurrence of child work and the risk of the occurrence of child work.

New Insights on Reaching Living Income (IDH & partners)
Rainforest Alliance Living Income Tool

Rainforest Alliance Living Income Tool

On request of Rainforest Alliance, Agri-Logic developed a tool for its cocoa certification programme that allows certificate holders to quickly and reliably estimate the gap to the living income of farmers in its supply chain. The model in the tool was developed from a large set of Farmer Field Book time-series data from Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. The model relies on the very strong relationship between a farmer’s production level and income. Tool users need only add data on 5 variables for each farmer to the tool. The 5 variables are in most instances already available in existing datasets of the certificate holder and as such require no additional data collection. Reliability testing showed the tool to be highly accurate, erring no more than a single percentage point when assigning farmers to above and below the living income categories. This tool is currently being rolled by Rainforest Alliance to cocoa certificate holders who wish to report on living income development.

Farmer segmentation for Sustainable Management Services (SMS)

Farmer segmentation for Sustainable Management Services (SMS)

Agri-Logic was requested by Sustainable Management Services (SMS) to assist in the development useful and meaningful segmentation methods that can be used to tailor services of SMS to farmers.

For farmer segmentation, Agri-Logic developed a multi-lingual dashboard, designed to allow the user to choose the segmentation logic by which farmer segmentation should occur. The dashboard shows the key characteristics of each segment, as defined by the user’s chosen settings. This can help the SMS operational teams to better target services to segments of farmers.

Commodities Export Development Nigeria

Commodities Export Development Nigeria

For AFEX Nigeria, an innovative commodities exchange connecting smallholder farmers to large scale buyers, we were contracted to develop commodities export with an initial focus on ginger and cocoa.

Based on a thorough due diligence to assess credibility, we generated recommendations to adjust the domestic trading template to export and facilitated market introductions to cocoa and spices buyers.

Assessment of the impact of certification on Ivorian cocoa farmers for Rainforest Alliance

Assessment of the impact of certification on Ivorian cocoa farmers for Rainforest Alliance

What are the impacts of certification for cocoa farmers in Côte d’Ivoire? In an impact assessment for Rainforest Alliance Agri-Logic compared certified cocoa farmers with non-certified farmers. The assessment focused on comparing key outcomes: production, yields, profitability and income at farmer level as well as comparing the driving factors behind these outcomes and the contribution of certification to these outcomes.

Key findings of the impact assessment:

  • Certified farmers show a greater reduction in the use of biocides that fall in the Highly Hazardous Pesticides group as defined by the Pesticide Action Network.
  • Certified farmers are more likely to use fertilisers. Their higher rate of savings provides them with a greater capacity to invest. Nevertheless, their choice of fertiliser material is equally skewed towards phosphorus-based products and they show a similar nutrient imbalance with far too little nitrogen being applied as do non-certified farmers.
  • The hours of work on carried out by minors is significantly lower on certified farms, after controlling for other factors, certified farmers use 33% less working hours made by minors. While the data does not allow the distinction between child labour and child work as defined by the International Organization of Labour (ILO), we conclude that the risk at child labour is lower at certified farms.
  • Certified farmers dedicate fewer hours to activities that are likely to result in better yields such as pruning, collecting diseased pods and pruning of shade trees.
  • Certified farmers are more likely to use formal banking services and tend to have lower debt levels and greater savings than non-certified farmers. These are of course desirable phenomena in their own right, but do not make certified farmers more profitable. Consequently, the incidence of poverty, whether measured as the share of farmers living below the international poverty line or the living income benchmark does not differ significantly between certified and non-certified farmers.
  • Cocoa production drives much of the income that farmers obtain and without meaningful changes in farmers’ nutrient management (fertilising and using an appropriate type of fertiliser) we do not expect to see much change in the reduction of poverty among cocoa farmers. This phenomenon helps to explain why despite years of investment in cocoa-growing communities change on the ground has been limited.